The Alaska Afterschool Network – Promoting Strong Afterschool Programs

Alaska Afterschool Network pic

Alaska Afterschool Network
Image: akafterschool.org

Since 2012, Charles Clement has served as president and chief executive officer of the South East Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC). Also active in charitable giving, Charles Clement contributes to the Alaska Children’s Trust, which operates the Alaska Afterschool Network.

The Alaska Afterschool Network consists of nonprofit, private, public, and tribal organizations that advocate for strong afterschool programs for children and families in an effort to improve the overall well-being and academic achievement of students. Research demonstrates that these programs typically increase attendance and academic performance as well as graduation rates. Further, afterschool programs reduce the expulsion rate and build students’ self-esteem, leading to a lower suicide rate and the development of protective factors that help students overcome trauma.

The Alaska Afterschool Network gathers the afterschool community to develop a cohesive system that fosters collaboration. The organization also disseminates best practices and encourages afterschool program staff to participate in continuing education to improve program quality. Finally, the network strives to improve access to afterschool programs and advocates for public policy that supports these programs at all government levels.

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WISEWOMAN Women’s Health Advances Public Health in Alaska

Charles Clement

Charles Clement serves as the president and chief executive officer of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC), a nonprofit tribal health group based in Juneau, Alaska, that involves 18 native communities. Under Charles Clement’s leadership, SEARHC fosters health awareness through an assortment of health-promotion programs.

These programs support healthier communities through identification and fulfillment of unmet healthcare needs. Additionally, the programs provide assistance with public policy, education, and problem-solving for issues related to community health. Although the programs cover a range of health issues, they operate with a universal goal of preventing disease and injury, supporting sick individuals, and advocating for public health policies.

SEARHC currently administers six health-promotion initiatives that include the WISEWOMAN Women’s Health Program. This serves low-income, under-insured, and uninsured Alaskan women by enabling them to access lifestyle programs and chronic disease risk-factor screenings. Additionally, it removes financial barriers that prevent them from affording cancer screenings, and provides referral services for preventing cardiovascular disease. Staff can also assist women in receiving any necessary follow-up care.

ACT’s Prevent Child Abuse Alaska Program

Alaska Children’s Trust pic

Alaska Children’s Trust
Image: alaskachildrenstrust.org

Charles Clement is an experienced Alaska-based business executive who has been serving as the president and chief executive officer of the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) since 2012. Outside of his responsibilities at SEARHC, Charles Clement actively supports charitable organizations such as Alaska Children’s Trust (ACT).

Since its inception in 1988, ACT has advocated for the prevention of child abuse and neglect in Alaska. Although the organization hosts numerous programs aligned to its mission, one of its defining programs is Prevent Child Abuse Alaska.

A state chapter of Chicago-based national organization Prevent Child Abuse America, Prevent Child Abuse Alaska is committed to ensuring the healthy development of children statewide. Working with its partner chapters from other states, the program fights for the existence of a national policy framework that could promote evidence-based strategies aimed at curbing the incidence of abuse and neglect. The Alaskan chapter leverages access to resources and relationships across the country to adopt best practices for its own use.

To learn more about other programs hosted or supported by ACT, visit AlaskaChildrensTrust.org.

Popular Bike Trails in Alaska

Lost Lake Trail Image: alaska.org

Lost Lake Trail
Image: alaska.org

 

Holding a master’s in public administration from the University of Alaska, Charles Clement has spent the last couple of decades working in the healthcare sector. Experienced in executive leadership, he serves as president and CEO of SEARHC. In his free time, Charles Clement enjoys staying active through such activities as biking. Alaska is home to numerous different biking trails that feature outstanding scenery and varying degrees of difficulty. Below are just a few examples of the state’s top bike trails:

Lost Lake Trail: Winding through seven miles of wilderness, Lost Lake Trail is an intermediate trail with about 1,800 feet of climbing. Dotted with rocks and roots, the stretch reaches its summit after about six miles and the remaining mile can often be enjoyable for bikers. However, the area is home to bears, so bikers should exercise caution.

– Glenn Highway Trail: A relatively uncrowded trail, the Glenn Highway Trail near Anchorage consists of smooth asphalt and only a slight uphill grade. It is perfect for bikers of all skill levels and ages and can easily stretch more than 40 miles, depending on the specific path riders take. The official trailhead is at David Park in Mountain View.

– Kepler-Bradley Lakes State Park: Combining singletrack, doubletrack cross-country, and beautiful lakes and fields, Kepler-Bradley Lakes State Park is a great place for beginning bikers. There are several different singletrack trails running through the 350-acre park. However, most of them have relaxed terrain and low elevations.

Alaska Considers Single-Payer Health Care

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium pic

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium
Image: searhc.org

Since 2012, Charles Clement has been the chief executive officer and president of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium. With previous positions at the Southcentral Foundation and Aetna US Healthcare, Charles Clement has spent his professional life in Alaska’s health care industry. For Alaska and Colorado business professionals, drastic change may be on the horizon as the states consider a single-payer health care system.

Traditionally in the United States, our third-party payer system means that we pay premiums to insurance companies like Aetna. In a single-payer system, the government provides health care, with citizens paying higher taxes to make up for it.

While Colorado is putting the decision to a vote, Alaska is considering it out of desperation, as the state has only one commercial insurer for residents under age 65. Since 2015, the state has lost three insurers due to Alaska’s isolation and relatively small population.

In June 2016, the Alaska state government approved a bill to subsidize health care costs for high-risk patients, paid for by levied taxes on insurance. Switching to a single-payer health care system will give Alaskans something in common with their closest neighbor, Canada, which is also on a single-payer system.

Heroin Abuse Becomes One of Alaska’s Largest Public Health Problems

Heroin Abuse

Heroin Abuse

 

The CEO of the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC), Charles Clement is a longtime healthcare executive currently based in Juneau, Alaska. As part of his professional commitment to a healthy Alaska, Charles Clement closely follows the public health crises most commonly impacting his state.

The state of Alaska has traditionally had some of the nation’s highest rates of domestic violence, child abuse, and chemical dependency. Alcoholism is widespread, and prescription drug addiction is on the rise. Research now suggests that heroin abuse in the state is growing and approaching dangerous levels.

Heroin use has nearly quadrupled in Alaska since 2002. Overdoses are also on the rise, causing a crisis in public health as well as a large financial burden on the medical system. The current rate of heroin-related death in the state is approximately 2.7 deaths per 100,000 people, which is triple the 2008 rate and 42% higher than the national average.

Officials blame some of this crisis on over-reliance on opioid pain relievers. People become addicted to prescription drugs and then fall back on heroin later. The drug has also become relatively inexpensive lately, exacerbating the problem.

Coverage Offered by Alaska’s Healing Hand Foundation

Healing Hand Foundation pic

Healing Hand Foundation
Image: hhf-ak.org

Charles Clement is the CEO and president of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Juneau. A business management professional with 19 years of experience, Charles Clement has served on the board of numerous associations and currently serves as a director for the Healing Hand Foundation.

The Healing Hand Foundation, established in 2001, assists the Native and veteran populations of Alaska who require additional funding for medical expenses not covered by state health insurance or private insurance companies.

The foundation offers financial assistance to those seeking three categories of medical need:

1. Medical Goods. These items include supplies and equipment such as wheelchairs, eyeglasses, walkers, and dentures.

2. Pharmaceuticals. Some medications, such as specialized cancer or blood pressure drugs, are not covered by health insurance.

3. Patient Travel. If a referral for treatment requires a patient to travel to a different city, Healing Hand Foundation can cover escort travel expenses.

Individuals can support the Healing Hand Foundation through a basic donation, or they can choose to have a set contribution deducted from their payroll each period.