Family Dinner Helps Children Succeed

Alaska Children’s Trust pic

Alaska Children’s Trust
Image: alaskachildrenstrust.org

Formerly an account executive for Aetna US Healthcare in Anchorage, Charles Clement currently serves as the president and chief executive officer of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium. One of Charles Clement’s favorite charities is the Alaska Children’s Trust, which works to prevent child abuse and encourages children to take steps toward their dreams.

One simple way parents can help their children achieve success is by eating with them. Scientific research shows that eating meals with your children benefits them in multiple ways. For younger children, the communal experience helps increase their vocabularies, which often leads to reading at a younger age. Family meals boost vocabulary even more than reading to a child.

For school-aged children, a consistent family mealtime is a predictor of high achievement in school and has an even greater impact than homework, sports, or art. One study found that teens who ate family dinner at least five days per week were two times as likely to get grades of A as students who had family dinner two times or fewer per week.

Something as simple as family dinner not only brings the family together but increases a child’s chance of success. For more ways to foster success, visit alaskachildrenstrust.org.

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Alaska Considers Single-Payer Health Care

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium pic

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium
Image: searhc.org

Since 2012, Charles Clement has been the chief executive officer and president of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium. With previous positions at the Southcentral Foundation and Aetna US Healthcare, Charles Clement has spent his professional life in Alaska’s health care industry. For Alaska and Colorado business professionals, drastic change may be on the horizon as the states consider a single-payer health care system.

Traditionally in the United States, our third-party payer system means that we pay premiums to insurance companies like Aetna. In a single-payer system, the government provides health care, with citizens paying higher taxes to make up for it.

While Colorado is putting the decision to a vote, Alaska is considering it out of desperation, as the state has only one commercial insurer for residents under age 65. Since 2015, the state has lost three insurers due to Alaska’s isolation and relatively small population.

In June 2016, the Alaska state government approved a bill to subsidize health care costs for high-risk patients, paid for by levied taxes on insurance. Switching to a single-payer health care system will give Alaskans something in common with their closest neighbor, Canada, which is also on a single-payer system.

Heroin Abuse Becomes One of Alaska’s Largest Public Health Problems

Heroin Abuse

Heroin Abuse

 

The CEO of the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC), Charles Clement is a longtime healthcare executive currently based in Juneau, Alaska. As part of his professional commitment to a healthy Alaska, Charles Clement closely follows the public health crises most commonly impacting his state.

The state of Alaska has traditionally had some of the nation’s highest rates of domestic violence, child abuse, and chemical dependency. Alcoholism is widespread, and prescription drug addiction is on the rise. Research now suggests that heroin abuse in the state is growing and approaching dangerous levels.

Heroin use has nearly quadrupled in Alaska since 2002. Overdoses are also on the rise, causing a crisis in public health as well as a large financial burden on the medical system. The current rate of heroin-related death in the state is approximately 2.7 deaths per 100,000 people, which is triple the 2008 rate and 42% higher than the national average.

Officials blame some of this crisis on over-reliance on opioid pain relievers. People become addicted to prescription drugs and then fall back on heroin later. The drug has also become relatively inexpensive lately, exacerbating the problem.

The Halibut Coalition Protects One of Alaska’s Greatest Resources

Halibut Coalition pic

Halibut Coalition
Image: halibutcoalition.org

As the president and CEO of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Charles Clement brings quality healthcare to thousands of residents. As part of his commitment to a healthy and prosperous Alaska, Charles Clement is also a member of the Halibut Coalition.

The Halibut Coalition exists to preserve and protect the Pacific region’s halibut population. It encourages responsible fishing practices and seeks to promote fair distribution of this valuable resource across commercial and recreational users.

The organization is currently focusing on legal avenues to protect their interests. The Coalition has expressed concern about specific commercial quotas placed on the industry. The impacts of new quotas could have far reaching implications for fishermen and the industries and communities surrounding them.

Similarly, the Coalition is involved in ongoing debates with Congress and the Senate to further their efforts. Members enjoyed recent success with H.R. 1335 in the House, but this resolution may face a veto in the White House.

Scientists, Doctors Claim Zika Could Present a Danger to the Olympics

Zika and the Olympics pic

Zika and the Olympics
Image: ecommerce-journal.com

Charles Clement has served as the president and CEO of Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Juneau, Alaska, since 2012. In addition to his professional work on a local level, such as developing infrastructure to support 18 Alaskan communities, Charles Clement also closely follows emerging public health trends across the world.

With growing international concerns about the Zika virus, a group consisting of 150 doctors, scientists, and medical ethicists have publicly called for the upcoming Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro to be pushed back or perhaps even relocated. In a letter to the World Health Organization (WHO) the group claims that the virus represents a danger to the athletes competing in the games, as well as spectators and media who will travel from outside the country to attend.

For its part, WHO has released a statement asserting that cancelling or moving the games will have no impact on the spreading of the virus. The group goes on say that numerous other countries have reported Zika outbreaks, yet travel within those countries is still safe, granted travelers follow the proper advice and precautions. WHO did, however, advise pregnant women not to travel to any area where the Zika virus has been reported, including Rio de Janeiro.

Coverage Offered by Alaska’s Healing Hand Foundation

Healing Hand Foundation pic

Healing Hand Foundation
Image: hhf-ak.org

Charles Clement is the CEO and president of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Juneau. A business management professional with 19 years of experience, Charles Clement has served on the board of numerous associations and currently serves as a director for the Healing Hand Foundation.

The Healing Hand Foundation, established in 2001, assists the Native and veteran populations of Alaska who require additional funding for medical expenses not covered by state health insurance or private insurance companies.

The foundation offers financial assistance to those seeking three categories of medical need:

1. Medical Goods. These items include supplies and equipment such as wheelchairs, eyeglasses, walkers, and dentures.

2. Pharmaceuticals. Some medications, such as specialized cancer or blood pressure drugs, are not covered by health insurance.

3. Patient Travel. If a referral for treatment requires a patient to travel to a different city, Healing Hand Foundation can cover escort travel expenses.

Individuals can support the Healing Hand Foundation through a basic donation, or they can choose to have a set contribution deducted from their payroll each period.

Nurse Line – The Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium pic

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium
Image: searhc.org

A business professional with nearly two decades of experience, Charles Clement is the CEO and president of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) in Juneau. Charles Clement manages 1,000 employees and has developed infrastructure in support of 18 communities in Southeast Alaska, in addition to overseeing government contracts and federal grants for the organization.

SEARHC is a nonprofit organization established in 1975 as a result of the Indian Self-Determination Act. It is the work of the consortium’s to provide excellent health care to Alaskan communities.

One of the services offered by SEARHC is its Nurse Advice Line, a phone-in advice hotline that allows individuals to get help during hours when clinics are closed. Available in 12 communities, the service enables patients to speak to a professional such as a medical services representative or a registered triage nurse when faced with unexpected health concerns.

The Nurse Advice Line can help patients determine whether or not their present health concern requires immediate medical attention, advice which can be of great benefit particularly to those residing in rural areas. The nurse can talk the patient through the steps of at-home care in the case of minor concerns or connect the patient directly with emergency services if the situation warrants.

The Nurse Advice Line is also available to those who require answers to general health-related inquiries.