The Basics of Running Technique

Running Technique pic

Running Technique
Image: runnersworld.com

Charles Clement leads the nonprofit health organization SEARHC, which serves 18 Native communities in Alaska. As president and CEO, he is responsible for developing both long- and short-term goals for the betterment of the tribal communities. During his spare time, Charles Clement keeps active and healthy by running.

To get the greatest benefit from running, runners must develop good form. Running with good form also helps protect runners against injuries. One way to improve one’s form is by perfecting the foot strike. It is important to keep a straight line from the hips to the point where the foot lands. This reduces strain from aggressive over-striding.

To avoid shoulder and lower-neck strain, runners are advised to drop their shoulders and allow their arms to swing loosely at their sides. Keeping the arms too close to the body limits the arm-swing, which requires the runner to exert more energy with each stride.

Proper breathing is also key. Belly breathing – when the abdominal area expands during inhalation and contracts during exhalation – should be the goal when running. This technique enables the lungs to function at full capacity, giving runners the maximum-possible oxygen uptake.

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Influx of Health Aides Celebrated by the Alaska Native Health Board

Alaska Native Health Board pic

Alaska Native Health Board
Image: anhb.org

The CEO and president of Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC), Charles Clement oversees employee management, infrastructure development, and execution of government contracts. In addition to his responsibilities with SEARHC, Charles Clement is also a member of the Alaska Native Health Board.

Established in 1968, the Alaska Native Health Board aims to promote holistic well-being within the Native peoples of Alaska, with the primary objectives including policy analysis and advocacy. This advocacy extends to increasing the number of health aides in the state through education. Recently, this goal was reached in part by the certification of 171 behavioral, dental, and community health aides.

These community health aides work in areas such as communicable disease control, maternal health, and environmental health in remote and underserved municipalities. Certification in these areas–received through the affiliated Community Health Aide Program Certification Board–allows many individuals to remain in or near their own communities, where jobs may otherwise be scarce.

This increase of community health aides raises the statewide total to almost 500 certified practitioners.

Family Dinner Helps Children Succeed

Alaska Children’s Trust pic

Alaska Children’s Trust
Image: alaskachildrenstrust.org

Formerly an account executive for Aetna US Healthcare in Anchorage, Charles Clement currently serves as the president and chief executive officer of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium. One of Charles Clement’s favorite charities is the Alaska Children’s Trust, which works to prevent child abuse and encourages children to take steps toward their dreams.

One simple way parents can help their children achieve success is by eating with them. Scientific research shows that eating meals with your children benefits them in multiple ways. For younger children, the communal experience helps increase their vocabularies, which often leads to reading at a younger age. Family meals boost vocabulary even more than reading to a child.

For school-aged children, a consistent family mealtime is a predictor of high achievement in school and has an even greater impact than homework, sports, or art. One study found that teens who ate family dinner at least five days per week were two times as likely to get grades of A as students who had family dinner two times or fewer per week.

Something as simple as family dinner not only brings the family together but increases a child’s chance of success. For more ways to foster success, visit alaskachildrenstrust.org.

Alaska Considers Single-Payer Health Care

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium pic

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium
Image: searhc.org

Since 2012, Charles Clement has been the chief executive officer and president of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium. With previous positions at the Southcentral Foundation and Aetna US Healthcare, Charles Clement has spent his professional life in Alaska’s health care industry. For Alaska and Colorado business professionals, drastic change may be on the horizon as the states consider a single-payer health care system.

Traditionally in the United States, our third-party payer system means that we pay premiums to insurance companies like Aetna. In a single-payer system, the government provides health care, with citizens paying higher taxes to make up for it.

While Colorado is putting the decision to a vote, Alaska is considering it out of desperation, as the state has only one commercial insurer for residents under age 65. Since 2015, the state has lost three insurers due to Alaska’s isolation and relatively small population.

In June 2016, the Alaska state government approved a bill to subsidize health care costs for high-risk patients, paid for by levied taxes on insurance. Switching to a single-payer health care system will give Alaskans something in common with their closest neighbor, Canada, which is also on a single-payer system.

Heroin Abuse Becomes One of Alaska’s Largest Public Health Problems

Heroin Abuse

Heroin Abuse

 

The CEO of the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC), Charles Clement is a longtime healthcare executive currently based in Juneau, Alaska. As part of his professional commitment to a healthy Alaska, Charles Clement closely follows the public health crises most commonly impacting his state.

The state of Alaska has traditionally had some of the nation’s highest rates of domestic violence, child abuse, and chemical dependency. Alcoholism is widespread, and prescription drug addiction is on the rise. Research now suggests that heroin abuse in the state is growing and approaching dangerous levels.

Heroin use has nearly quadrupled in Alaska since 2002. Overdoses are also on the rise, causing a crisis in public health as well as a large financial burden on the medical system. The current rate of heroin-related death in the state is approximately 2.7 deaths per 100,000 people, which is triple the 2008 rate and 42% higher than the national average.

Officials blame some of this crisis on over-reliance on opioid pain relievers. People become addicted to prescription drugs and then fall back on heroin later. The drug has also become relatively inexpensive lately, exacerbating the problem.

The Halibut Coalition Protects One of Alaska’s Greatest Resources

Halibut Coalition pic

Halibut Coalition
Image: halibutcoalition.org

As the president and CEO of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium, Charles Clement brings quality healthcare to thousands of residents. As part of his commitment to a healthy and prosperous Alaska, Charles Clement is also a member of the Halibut Coalition.

The Halibut Coalition exists to preserve and protect the Pacific region’s halibut population. It encourages responsible fishing practices and seeks to promote fair distribution of this valuable resource across commercial and recreational users.

The organization is currently focusing on legal avenues to protect their interests. The Coalition has expressed concern about specific commercial quotas placed on the industry. The impacts of new quotas could have far reaching implications for fishermen and the industries and communities surrounding them.

Similarly, the Coalition is involved in ongoing debates with Congress and the Senate to further their efforts. Members enjoyed recent success with H.R. 1335 in the House, but this resolution may face a veto in the White House.

Scientists, Doctors Claim Zika Could Present a Danger to the Olympics

Zika and the Olympics pic

Zika and the Olympics
Image: ecommerce-journal.com

Charles Clement has served as the president and CEO of Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Juneau, Alaska, since 2012. In addition to his professional work on a local level, such as developing infrastructure to support 18 Alaskan communities, Charles Clement also closely follows emerging public health trends across the world.

With growing international concerns about the Zika virus, a group consisting of 150 doctors, scientists, and medical ethicists have publicly called for the upcoming Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro to be pushed back or perhaps even relocated. In a letter to the World Health Organization (WHO) the group claims that the virus represents a danger to the athletes competing in the games, as well as spectators and media who will travel from outside the country to attend.

For its part, WHO has released a statement asserting that cancelling or moving the games will have no impact on the spreading of the virus. The group goes on say that numerous other countries have reported Zika outbreaks, yet travel within those countries is still safe, granted travelers follow the proper advice and precautions. WHO did, however, advise pregnant women not to travel to any area where the Zika virus has been reported, including Rio de Janeiro.