Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Offers Food Distribution

Healthy Alaska Natives Foundation pic
Healthy Alaska Natives Foundation
Image: inspiringgoodhealth.org

 

Charles Clement serves as the president and CEO of South East Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC), located in Juneau, Alaska. In his roles, he efficiently juggles multiple priorities while ensuring that developing communities within Alaska are supported with appropriate infrastructure. Outside of work, Charles Clement encourages and supports the efforts of the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.

The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium began in 1998, when the organization assumed responsibility for native health care. The organization’s accomplishments are varied and include research for drug treatments for hepatitis C to education on the proper installation of car seats and smoke detectors.

The consortium also implemented the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), an initiative that provides families with food packages consisting of meats, eggs, cornmeal, pastas, vegetables, beans, and other healthy foods for creating wholesome meals. The program serves those living on reservations or in approved areas who are part of a tribe recognized by the federal government. Those who participate in the program may not receive SNAP benefits (also known as food stamps) at the same time.

Study Shows How Running Engages the Brain for Better Concentration

Running pic
Running
Image: mensfitness.com

Charles Clement acts as the president and CEO for his company SEARHC, located in Alaska. In his free time, Charles Clement enjoys several hobbies, including running.

According to a recent study performed at the University of Arizona, individuals who run multitask more readily and have higher levels of concentration. The study went on to say that the area of the brain with unfocused thoughts is not as active in individuals who run regularly. It is believed that running engages the brain so much as the runner faces changing surfaces (such as grass to pavement), avoiding obstacles, and dealing with thinking on the fly. This prepares the brain to react more readily, putting to use skills that are essential in navigation and focus. Although researchers do not believe that running alone will improve one’s intellect, the consequences of how the brain needs to focus while participating in this sport carry on to other facets of life, including work and time management.

Running in Cold Weather

Running in Cold Weather pic
Running in Cold Weather
Image: runnersworld.com

For nearly two decades, Charles Clement has been leading a successful career in the healthcare industry. He started his career as an account executive for Aetna US Healthcare in Anchorage, Alaska, and now leads the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) as CEO and president. In his free time, Charles Clement enjoys running.

When it’s cold out, many runners are discouraged from maintaining their normal routine, but this doesn’t have to be the case. As temperatures start dropping, setting regular running plans with others is a great way to maintain motivation. This turns running into a social activity and, rather than answering only to themselves, runners will have to answer to their running group or partner. Beyond this, runners can make their cold-weather runs easier by running into the wind at the beginning. Doing so means the wind is at their back during the second half of their routine and prevents chills and colds.

Cold-weather running also requires the proper clothing. It’s important that runners do not overdress for a cold run. Although layers and thick clothing may seem correct, the body warms up when running and these heavy clothes can easily become too warm and cumbersome. Typically, runners should dress as if the weather is 20 degrees warmer. Thin layers allow air to breath around the body more and protect against wind while pulling sweat away from the body. Runners will also need good gloves or mittens, socks that keep the feet warm while removing sweat, and a hat. Despite the cold, runners also need plenty of water to stay hydrated.

ANHB Announces Accreditation of Iḷisaġvik College’s DHAT Program

Alaska Native Health Board pic
Alaska Native Health Board
Image: anhb.org

Accomplished healthcare executive Charles Clement oversees operations and development at the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) as president and CEO. Active in the professional community, Charles Clement is involved with such professional organizations as the Alaska Native Health Board.

A 26-member board entity, the Alaska Native Health Board (ANHB) has been promoting the physical, mental, and cultural well-being of Alaska Native people since 1968. In October 2016, the organization reported on the Northwest Commission on College and Universities’ recent approval of the Dental Health Aide Therapist (DHAT) program. Offered at Iḷisaġvik College in Barrow, the newly accredited program gives DHAT students the chance to earn an Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree. It improves graduates’ career options and grants DHAT students full access to the Tribal college’s student services, such as tutoring and financial aid.

Iḷisaġvik College and ANTHC first announced its efforts to accredit the DHAT program in 2015. They formally announced their partnership at that year’s DHAT graduation ceremony and stated that students who started the DHAT program in July 2015 were the first students to be enrolled in the degree program. Over the years, the DHAT program has made huge contributions to the overall well-being and oral health of Alaska Native individuals in the rural areas of Alaska. Dental care and prevention services were expanded to over 40,000 Alaskan Native people in 81 rural communities.

Mt. Edgcumbe Hospital Recognized for High-Quality Health Care

Mt. Edgcumbe Hospital Image: searhc.org
Mt. Edgcumbe Hospital
Image: searhc.org

 

The president and CEO of the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC), Charles Clement develops infrastructure, manages overall operations, and works with the group’s board of directors. Possessing extensive experience in executive healthcare management, Charles Clement has helped SEARHC reach numerous milestones.

Recently the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium’s Mt. Edgcumbe Hospital was one of four 2016 Hospital Quality Achievement Award winners. Awards were accepted during the Alaska State Hospital and Nursing Home Association (ASHNHA) Annual Conference in Soldotna and were given by Mountain-Pacific Quality Health. The other hospitals that received the award include Fairbanks Memorial Hospital, Providence Kodiak Island Medical Center, and Alaska Regional Hospital.

The Hospital Quality Awards are the top award given by Mountain-Pacific Quality Health. All winners must meet 11 different measures that focus on improving the quality of medical service and increasing patient safety. All hospitals in the state are eligible to win the award, regardless of size and location. Rather than focusing on patient numbers, Mountain-Pacific Quality Health prefers recognizing high levels of care in an attempt to improve the overall healthcare system in the state.

Popular Bike Trails in Alaska

Lost Lake Trail Image: alaska.org
Lost Lake Trail
Image: alaska.org

 

Holding a master’s in public administration from the University of Alaska, Charles Clement has spent the last couple of decades working in the healthcare sector. Experienced in executive leadership, he serves as president and CEO of SEARHC. In his free time, Charles Clement enjoys staying active through such activities as biking. Alaska is home to numerous different biking trails that feature outstanding scenery and varying degrees of difficulty. Below are just a few examples of the state’s top bike trails:

Lost Lake Trail: Winding through seven miles of wilderness, Lost Lake Trail is an intermediate trail with about 1,800 feet of climbing. Dotted with rocks and roots, the stretch reaches its summit after about six miles and the remaining mile can often be enjoyable for bikers. However, the area is home to bears, so bikers should exercise caution.

– Glenn Highway Trail: A relatively uncrowded trail, the Glenn Highway Trail near Anchorage consists of smooth asphalt and only a slight uphill grade. It is perfect for bikers of all skill levels and ages and can easily stretch more than 40 miles, depending on the specific path riders take. The official trailhead is at David Park in Mountain View.

– Kepler-Bradley Lakes State Park: Combining singletrack, doubletrack cross-country, and beautiful lakes and fields, Kepler-Bradley Lakes State Park is a great place for beginning bikers. There are several different singletrack trails running through the 350-acre park. However, most of them have relaxed terrain and low elevations.

The Basics of Running Technique

Running Technique pic
Running Technique
Image: runnersworld.com

Charles Clement leads the nonprofit health organization SEARHC, which serves 18 Native communities in Alaska. As president and CEO, he is responsible for developing both long- and short-term goals for the betterment of the tribal communities. During his spare time, Charles Clement keeps active and healthy by running.

To get the greatest benefit from running, runners must develop good form. Running with good form also helps protect runners against injuries. One way to improve one’s form is by perfecting the foot strike. It is important to keep a straight line from the hips to the point where the foot lands. This reduces strain from aggressive over-striding.

To avoid shoulder and lower-neck strain, runners are advised to drop their shoulders and allow their arms to swing loosely at their sides. Keeping the arms too close to the body limits the arm-swing, which requires the runner to exert more energy with each stride.

Proper breathing is also key. Belly breathing – when the abdominal area expands during inhalation and contracts during exhalation – should be the goal when running. This technique enables the lungs to function at full capacity, giving runners the maximum-possible oxygen uptake.