Scientists, Doctors Claim Zika Could Present a Danger to the Olympics

Zika and the Olympics pic

Zika and the Olympics
Image: ecommerce-journal.com

Charles Clement has served as the president and CEO of Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Juneau, Alaska, since 2012. In addition to his professional work on a local level, such as developing infrastructure to support 18 Alaskan communities, Charles Clement also closely follows emerging public health trends across the world.

With growing international concerns about the Zika virus, a group consisting of 150 doctors, scientists, and medical ethicists have publicly called for the upcoming Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro to be pushed back or perhaps even relocated. In a letter to the World Health Organization (WHO) the group claims that the virus represents a danger to the athletes competing in the games, as well as spectators and media who will travel from outside the country to attend.

For its part, WHO has released a statement asserting that cancelling or moving the games will have no impact on the spreading of the virus. The group goes on say that numerous other countries have reported Zika outbreaks, yet travel within those countries is still safe, granted travelers follow the proper advice and precautions. WHO did, however, advise pregnant women not to travel to any area where the Zika virus has been reported, including Rio de Janeiro.

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Nurse Line – The Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium pic

Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium
Image: searhc.org

A business professional with nearly two decades of experience, Charles Clement is the CEO and president of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) in Juneau. Charles Clement manages 1,000 employees and has developed infrastructure in support of 18 communities in Southeast Alaska, in addition to overseeing government contracts and federal grants for the organization.

SEARHC is a nonprofit organization established in 1975 as a result of the Indian Self-Determination Act. It is the work of the consortium’s to provide excellent health care to Alaskan communities.

One of the services offered by SEARHC is its Nurse Advice Line, a phone-in advice hotline that allows individuals to get help during hours when clinics are closed. Available in 12 communities, the service enables patients to speak to a professional such as a medical services representative or a registered triage nurse when faced with unexpected health concerns.

The Nurse Advice Line can help patients determine whether or not their present health concern requires immediate medical attention, advice which can be of great benefit particularly to those residing in rural areas. The nurse can talk the patient through the steps of at-home care in the case of minor concerns or connect the patient directly with emergency services if the situation warrants.

The Nurse Advice Line is also available to those who require answers to general health-related inquiries.

ANTHC Builds a 202-Room Patient Housing Facility

President of Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Juneau, Alaska, Charles Clement manages a $125 million operation. Staying current on topics impacting the health care industry, Charles Clement and SEARHC maintain a strong relationship with the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC).

ANTHC is in the progress of constructing a 202-room patient housing facility in Anchorage. Supporting the Alaska Native Medical Center, the infrastructure is slated to open fall 2016 and will provide lodging for patients and families traveling to Anchorage to receive care. ANTHC believes the project will ease the burden of travel and hotel expenditures for both the patients and the Alaska Tribal Health System.

With 30 rooms dedicated to pre-maternal patients and their families, the facility will connect directly to the medical center via a sky bridge. Patients with high-risk pregnancies or who require specialty medical care or infusion and radiation therapy will have improved access to treatment as well. Planned building features include communal living spaces, cooking areas, self-serve laundry rooms, and an exercise room.

Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Receives Project Donation

For the last three years, healthcare executive Charles Clement has served as president and CEO of the SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium(SEARHC) in Juneau, Alaska. Associated to his responsibilities with the organization, Charles Clement maintains an active fundraising agenda.

SouthEast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) was recently awarded a $200,000 grant from the law firm of Sonosky, Chambers, Sachse, Endreson & Perry. The nearly 40 year old firm specializes in tribal law and recently launched a $3.5 million charitable program to support tribal health care. The grant awarded to SEARHC is part of that program.
SEARHC is extremely grateful to be a recipient of the law firm’s generous charitable giving endeavors. The grant will be used toward the Consortium’s pediatric dental expansion project in Juneau.

The project will aid children with an array of dental needs and will help reduce the costs of healthcare and travel for both the community of Juneau as well as outlying villages in the region. The expanded facility will open in 2016.

Epidemiology Center of the ANTHC

Charles Clement currently leads as the president and CEO of the South East Alaska Regional Health Consortium in Juneau. Charles Clement also belongs to local groups like the Alaska NativeBrotherhood a nonprofit organization focused on advocacy for Native Alaska people and issues and a past board member of Alaska Naive Tribal Health Consortium

As a past board member for the Alaska Native Tribal Heal Consortium a part of its mission, ANTHC operates an Epidemiology Center, which serves Alaska Native people by providing health monitoring and reporting services. Since 1969, the Alaska Native Tumor Registry has studied the frequent occurrence of tumors among the people it serves. The Epidemiology Center continues this effort through programs that gather health data, support family health, and conduct CRC screening.

One of 12 Tribal Epidemiology Centers recognized in the nation, the Alaska Native Epidemiology Center operates as part of the ANTHC’s Division of Community Health Services. The center assists other health institutions, such as the National Epidemiology Program, and focuses on its core objectives of assistance, data sharing, surveillance, and disease prevention.