Monthly Archives: April 2018

SEARHC’s WISEWOMAN Program Supports Women’s Health

 

WISEWOMAN Women’s Health pic

WISEWOMAN Women’s Health
Image: cdc.gov

Charles Clement is the CEO and president of the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) in Juneau. In this role, Charles Clement leads the organization in its efforts to support the health of the 27 communities of the region through efforts like SEARHC’s WISEWOMAN program.

WISEWOMAN is one of several programs aimed at communities that may need special help. This program focuses on women between the ages of 30 and 64, especially if they are in a low-income bracket or lack insurance for basic health care.

Cancer screening is a major aspect of this program, and this year, WISEWOMAN partnered with the Breast Cancer Detection Center to offer mobile mammography services to women in Alaska for whom traveling might be a barrier to get a screening. While lung cancer is the most common cause of death by cancer in the region, breast cancer is the second most common. Early detection can greatly help reduce the likelihood of death, and SEARHC aims to remove the financial and geographical barriers that might prevent women from getting screenings in time.

WISEWOMAN also helps Alaskan women access other kinds of screening and health care, including pap tests, screenings for chronic disease, and lifestyle programs for general health and prevention.

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SEARHC MEH Hugs and Kisses Implementation

    Charles Clement has been president and CEO of Juneau-based Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) since 2012, and brings more than two decades of experience in healthcare to the organization. One often-overlooked aspect of patient care Charles Clement oversees as the leader of SEARHC is healthcare security.

As part of a healthcare security initiative, Mt. Edgecumbe Hospital (MEH) has deployed the Hugs Wi-Fi Infant Protection system, as well as its Kisses Mother component. The Hugs and Kisses system protects infants from abduction anywhere within a hospital’s wireless network, using an ankle monitor with a tamper-proof detection band. Hospital administrators can track a monitored child anywhere within the hospital’s wireless area, and the detection of infants outside the labor and delivery unit with no staff transportation record automatically triggers an alarm. The Kisses component includes a wrist monitor for the mother, which notifies staff that mother and infant are together when the child and mother monitors are sufficiently close.

The implementation of this program is part of SEARHC’s commitment to patient safety and security. Hugs and Kisses is one of many such upgrades recently implemented at MEH to improve the quality of patient care.