Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Offers Food Distribution

Healthy Alaska Natives Foundation pic

Healthy Alaska Natives Foundation
Image: inspiringgoodhealth.org

 

Charles Clement serves as the president and CEO of South East Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC), located in Juneau, Alaska. In his roles, he efficiently juggles multiple priorities while ensuring that developing communities within Alaska are supported with appropriate infrastructure. Outside of work, Charles Clement encourages and supports the efforts of the Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium.

The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium began in 1998, when the organization assumed responsibility for native health care. The organization’s accomplishments are varied and include research for drug treatments for hepatitis C to education on the proper installation of car seats and smoke detectors.

The consortium also implemented the Food Distribution Program on Indian Reservations (FDPIR), an initiative that provides families with food packages consisting of meats, eggs, cornmeal, pastas, vegetables, beans, and other healthy foods for creating wholesome meals. The program serves those living on reservations or in approved areas who are part of a tribe recognized by the federal government. Those who participate in the program may not receive SNAP benefits (also known as food stamps) at the same time.

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Study Shows How Running Engages the Brain for Better Concentration

Running pic

Running
Image: mensfitness.com

Charles Clement acts as the president and CEO for his company SEARHC, located in Alaska. In his free time, Charles Clement enjoys several hobbies, including running.

According to a recent study performed at the University of Arizona, individuals who run multitask more readily and have higher levels of concentration. The study went on to say that the area of the brain with unfocused thoughts is not as active in individuals who run regularly. It is believed that running engages the brain so much as the runner faces changing surfaces (such as grass to pavement), avoiding obstacles, and dealing with thinking on the fly. This prepares the brain to react more readily, putting to use skills that are essential in navigation and focus. Although researchers do not believe that running alone will improve one’s intellect, the consequences of how the brain needs to focus while participating in this sport carry on to other facets of life, including work and time management.

Running in Cold Weather

Running in Cold Weather pic

Running in Cold Weather
Image: runnersworld.com

For nearly two decades, Charles Clement has been leading a successful career in the healthcare industry. He started his career as an account executive for Aetna US Healthcare in Anchorage, Alaska, and now leads the Southeast Alaska Regional Health Consortium (SEARHC) as CEO and president. In his free time, Charles Clement enjoys running.

When it’s cold out, many runners are discouraged from maintaining their normal routine, but this doesn’t have to be the case. As temperatures start dropping, setting regular running plans with others is a great way to maintain motivation. This turns running into a social activity and, rather than answering only to themselves, runners will have to answer to their running group or partner. Beyond this, runners can make their cold-weather runs easier by running into the wind at the beginning. Doing so means the wind is at their back during the second half of their routine and prevents chills and colds.

Cold-weather running also requires the proper clothing. It’s important that runners do not overdress for a cold run. Although layers and thick clothing may seem correct, the body warms up when running and these heavy clothes can easily become too warm and cumbersome. Typically, runners should dress as if the weather is 20 degrees warmer. Thin layers allow air to breath around the body more and protect against wind while pulling sweat away from the body. Runners will also need good gloves or mittens, socks that keep the feet warm while removing sweat, and a hat. Despite the cold, runners also need plenty of water to stay hydrated.